Georgia’s workers’ compensation system is designed to protect those who get hurt or sickened while working for an employer. Employers carry workers’ compensation insurance to prevent themselves from being liable for a worker’s injuries.

Georgia’s system is designed as a no-fault system of insurance. This means that the employer and private insurer will pay benefits to injured employees even when the accident was caused by the employee’s actions or medical condition. There are some exceptions to this rule, e.g., if employees intentionally cause harm to themselves in order to make claims.

Workers’ compensation provides self-help information about the benefits available to employees who get hurt. This coverage can’t be waived unless you are an officer in a corporation and request to be excluded from coverage. This is a rare situation that affects very few people.

It is important to note that injuries caused by substance abuse or intoxication will not be covered by workers’ compensation. Workers’ comp does cover most other circumstances, providing necessary medical treatment, vocational rehabilitation when necessary, weekly benefits while a worker is disabled and death, scarring and physical impairment benefits.

Once you are hurt on the job, in most circumstances, you are only eligible to be covered by workers’ compensation. Your employer can’t be sued unless they intentionally caused the accident that injured you. In that case, your attorney can help you initiate a separate claim to sue your employer directly for the injuries they caused and for their negative intentions.

It may be possible to appeal a denial of your workers’ comp benefits. Speaking to a Georgia attorney who is familiar with the state’s workers’ compensation laws can be quite helpful if your claim is delayed or denied.