Fewer people are going to bars and restaurants these days, in large part, due to the coronavirus. The Georgia dining and service industries have taken quite a financial hit, and most of us have had to do without the enjoyable experience of going out with friends and family.

Some of the only positive aspects of the Covid-19 pandemic have been fewer car accidents and fewer drunk driving arrests. These were a byproduct of business shutdowns and working from home. As the economy begins to reopen, however, a new state law may make it easier for restaurants and bars to financially recover while also potentially reducing rates of drunk driving.

Earlier this month, Governor Kemp signed House Bill 879. When it goes into effect, Georgians will be able to get home delivery of wine, beer and liquor from the establishments where they would normally buy alcohol – including bars, restaurants and grocery stores.

There are, of course, some stipulations that make alcohol delivery different from other types of deliveries. These include:

  • Customers must create an account with the establishment making the delivery
  • Customers must show ID when the alcohol is delivered
  • Delivery drivers cannot make a delivery if the recipient isn’t home, hasn’t shown ID or is “visibly intoxicated”
  • Deliveries are subject to the same alcohol-restriction laws already in place for in-store sales (such as no morning sales on Sundays)
  • Delivery of alcohol can be banned at the local level if the local government sees fit to do so

Only time will tell what kind of ripple effects this new law will have on other aspects of life in Georgia, such as traffic safety. We must hope, however, that alcohol delivery will allow Georgians to enjoy these beverages in their own homes and greatly reduce the risks of being arrested for drunk driving or being involved in a car accident caused by a drunk driver.