As you prepare for your divorce, you will likely worry about making ends meet afterward. Georgia law does not guarantee alimony as part of your settlement. And if your marriage broke up due to aggravating factors on your part, you could be barred from it altogether. Yet, it’s important to understand how state courts decide to award alimony. Knowing these factors can help you defend your ability to receive it.

Georgia’s alimony guidelines

Georgia’s alimony guidelines are relatively traditional and strict. State courts rarely award permanent alimony, which lasts indefinitely and ends only at your remarriage or the death of you or your spouse. Instead, courts favor rehabilitative alimony, which will provide you short-term support until you can get on your feet. And furthermore, Georgia considers adultery a bar to alimony. You will become ineligible for it, then, if you had an affair or a history of infidelity that caused your divorce. The exception to this rule is if your spouse forgave you for your actions.

In considering whether to award alimony, a judge will weigh numerous factors, including:

  • The length of your marriage
  • The standard of living you and your spouse maintained
  • You and your spouse’s health
  • Whether you require education or training to become self-supporting
  • You and your spouse’s individual financial circumstances
  • You and your spouse’s marital role and contributions

Receiving alimony

Whether you receive rehabilitative or permanent alimony depends on your needs. But regardless of its length, a fair award can help you achieve financial stability after your divorce. A family law attorney can guide you toward an outcome that reflects your situation.